Rachel Whiteread

British, born 1963

Untitled (Domestic)

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

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© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled (Domestic), 2002

Artwork Details

Collection Highlight

Materials

plaster, fiberglass, and wood

Measurements

overall: 266 1/8 x 229 7/8 x 96 1/2 inches (675.9575 x 583.8825 x 245.11 cm)

Collection Buffalo AKG Art Museum

Credit

Owned jointly by Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo: George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund; and Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: The Henry L. Hillman Fund, 2006

Accession ID

2006:16a-g

Rachel Whiteread has received critical acclaim for her unique body of work in which she subverts the function and form of everyday objects and familiar spaces. Since the late 1980s, the artist has used concrete, resin, rubber, and even dental plaster to cast sculptures of everything from air mattresses and bathtubs to the interior of a library and the exterior of a house. However, instead of making a highly detailed reproduction, Whiteread typically casts the negative space inside or surrounding her subjects to create a ghostly impression of the original.

Untitled (Domestic) is the result of the artist’s exploration of the less traversed spaces within buildings. To create this work, she cast the area around the fire escape staircase at what was then the Haunch of Venison Gallery in London, England (a late eighteenth-century building that was originally the home of Admiral Lord Nelson). By removing the flight of steps from its original context, Whiteread evokes a disorienting sense of both recollection and loss, while, at the same time, realizing her desire to imbue the formal aspects of the sculptural medium with architectural qualities.

Other Works by This Artist